Through Discovery Channel Entrance to Campbell River

Through Discovery Channel Entrance to Campbell River 
To catch a convenient slack at the entrance of Discovery Channel, we added a rest day in Comox.  There we had the chance to do laundry, have a sandwich at the history Lorne Pub, and spend time in the library, where Piers got in touch via Skype video.   Great news! He proposes meeting us in Prince Rupert on or about July 10, by which time we’ll really welcome crew. Piers can leave Portland by bus for a journey of less than 48 hours and then hang out in the youth hostel until we arrive.  And should our plans, change we’ll probably have a chance to get word to him.  
Navigating the Comox Bar always requires concentration but we were fresh at our 7:40 am departure and enjoyed the sun as we finally rounded the second east cardinal buoy and motored up the coast.  Hitting the Mudge Island entrance to Discovery at slack, we found it full of sport fishermen in small boats.  Easy as pie.  
Last year we went north through the inland Inland Passage rather than Discovery Channel adjacent to Vancouver Island, where Campbell River lies, an important junction of mountains and sea, of the Salish coastal peoples and tribes of the north, of civilization and wilderness.  And Discovery Channel is where tides first flow in from and ebb out toward the north, rather than though the Strait of Juan de Fuca.    
When we stopped at the fuel dock at new Discovery Coast Marina, the newest and the most northerly of the three in Campbell River, we calculated Aurora is using less than a half gallon of diesel an hour, compared with the 8 or 10 gallons an hour burned by power boats.)  To figure out why our oil pressure gauge was always reading high – even though we have a back up alarm for low oil pressure – we’d phoned ahead to Altech Diesel and they dispatched the amiable Marcus who replaced something small and expensive and put our minds at ease on a couple of other questions.  

To catch a convenient slack at the entrance of Discovery Channel, we added a rest day in Comox.  There we had the chance to do laundry, have a sandwich at the historic Lorne Pub, and spend time in the library, where Piers got in touch via Skype video.   Great news!  He proposes meeting us in Prince Rupert on or about July 10, by which time we’ll really welcome crew. Piers can leave Portland by bus for a journey of less than 48 hours and then hang out in the youth hostel until we arrive.  And should our plans, change we’ll probably have a chance to get word to him.  

Navigating the Comox Bar always requires concentration but we were fresh at our 7:40 am departure and enjoyed the sun as we finally rounded the second east cardinal buoy and motored up the coast.  Hitting the Mudge Island entrance to Discovery at slack, we found it full of sport fishermen in small outboards.  Easy as pie.  

Last year we went north through the inside Inland Passage rather than Discovery Channel adjacent to Vancouver Island, where Campbell River lies, an important junction of mountains and sea, of  Salish coastal peoples and tribes of the north, of civilization and wilderness.  And Discovery Channel is where tides first flow in from and ebb out toward the north, rather than though the Strait of Juan de Fuca.    

When we stopped at the fuel dock at new Discovery Coast Marina, the newest and the most northerly of the three in Campbell River, we calculated Aurora is using less than a half gallon of diesel an hour.  (Compare that with the 8 or 10 gallons an hour burned by power boats.)  To figure out why our oil pressure gauge was always reading high – even though we have a back up alarm to warn us of low oil pressure – we’d phoned ahead to Altech Diesel and they dispatched the amiable Marcus, who replaced something small and expensive and put our minds at ease on a couple of other questions.

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