Sartorial Bliss

 

I am so comfortable in these clothes.  From the bottom up.   Old white leather sneakers, toes completely out.  The back up pair. For good weather, as leather doesn’t dry out.  Socks are a soft, baby blue pair that Dad gave to Mom for Christmas many years ago. Made of some miracle fiber: always warm, always dry, always pretty and it takes forever for them to smell.  Then jeans, like the shoes, suitable only for good weather.  Anything else it’s snow pants under foul weather gear. 
Next to my skin a full set of silk underwear, in this case donated by Dad.   I have four sets of silk underwear. Dad gave me his set this summer, saying he hated the things.   Others must feel the same way, because I know to look in thrift stores, from whence another set.  And a black pair of bottoms to go with the lacey knit, scoop neck black top Nance gave me for my birthday many years ago, its long hem now holey from being tucked into pants hundreds of times.  Finally, I have the white silkies that Mom obviously liked; they are now yellow and brittle with wear.  
On top is a long-sleeved Goodwill crewneck with black, blue, turquoise and chartreuse stripes.  Goes with everything.  Next a fine Eddie Bauer turtleneck made of navy polyproplene.  Then a wonderful green fleece from a stack of garments gifted by Joan Hastings to whom I’d mentioned that I hoped to find some in a second hand store.   Jack always wears a companion piece in bright red.  On top of everything is a down jacket, a period piece from the late 80s when REI opened a store in Arlington, Virginia.
Hands?  One of 25 motely pairs of gloves on board. Inspired by a woman who set up a missing glove website for her city, I started picking up lone gloves and mittens from the street last winter.  After tossing the first several into the trunk of the car with the infrequently used snow chains, I realized that near matches are appropriate for the boat as well. As we move north a progressively larger proportion of the glove supply is hanging out to dry at any one time. 
Finally, on top, my dream hat.  Cut a bit like an old fashioned aviator’s helmet, it’s deep aqua with a navy fleece lining.  Flaps velcro under my chin to keep my ears and neck warm and out of the rays. If it’s really cold or my bottom lip is sunburned, I just tuck a neck gaiter into the flaps.   When I get too hot, up go the flaps velcroed on my crown – and the hat stays on even in thirty knots of wind.   A brim keeps the sun off my face or rain off my glasses, but folds back to get out of the way of the binoculars.  Best of all it goes in my pocket.   
This dream hat is a somewhat accidental offering from Lisa Walker, who works in Old Town and who used to crew around the world with a really serious racing team.  It came in a huge green waterproof duffle of gear Lisa gifted us, along with the Eddie Bauer shirt, the foulies that Piers will wear, and stuff we’re saving for when we need to look nautical and nice.   Lisa has recently taken up bike commuting to work from her home in St John (saying it gives her a permanent smile all day long).  This hat should fit nicely under her helmet and bring as much cozy comfort to her two hours a winter day in the saddle as it has to my weeks on the water.   So it will be returned with heartfelt gratitude.  Thank you, Lisa and all the rest of you, for keeping us warm, dry and thinking of you.

I am so comfortable in these clothes.  From the bottom up.   Old white leather sneakers, toes completely out.  The back up pair. For good weather, as leather doesn’t dry out.  Socks are a soft, baby blue pair that Dad gave to Mom for Christmas many years ago. Made of some miracle fiber: always warm, always dry, always pretty and it takes forever for them to smell.  Then jeans, like the shoes, suitable only for good weather.  Anything else it’s snow pants under foul weather gear. 

Next to my skin a full set of silk underwear, in this case donated by Dad.   I have four sets of silk underwear. Dad gave me his set this summer, saying he hated the things.   Others must feel the same way, because I know to look in thrift stores, from whence another set.  And a black pair of bottoms to go with the lacey knit, scoop neck black top Nance gave me for my birthday many years ago, its long hem now holey from being tucked into pants hundreds of times.  Finally, I have the white silkies that Mom obviously liked; they are now yellow and brittle with wear.  

On top is a long-sleeved Goodwill crewneck with black, blue, turquoise and chartreuse stripes.  Goes with everything.  Next a fine Eddie Bauer turtleneck made of navy polyproplene.  Then a wonderful green fleece from a stack of garments gifted by Joan Hastings to whom I’d mentioned that I hoped to find some in a second hand store.   Jack always wears a companion piece in bright red.  On top of everything is a down jacket, a period piece from the late 80s when REI opened a store in Arlington, Virginia.

Hands?  One of 25 motely pairs of gloves on board. Inspired by a woman who set up a missing glove website for her city, I started picking up lone gloves and mittens from the street last winter.  After tossing the first several into the trunk of the car with the infrequently used snow chains, I realized that near matches are appropriate for the boat as well. As we move north a progressively larger proportion of the glove supply is hanging out to dry at any one time. 

IMG_7342Finally, on top, my dream hat.  Cut a bit like an old fashioned aviator’s helmet, it’s deep aqua with a navy fleece lining.  Flaps velcro under my chin to keep my ears and neck warm and out of the rays. If it’s really cold or my bottom lip is sunburned, I just tuck a neck gaiter into the flaps.   When I get too hot, up go the flaps velcroed on my crown – and the hat stays on even in thirty knots of wind.   A brim keeps the sun off my face or rain off my glasses, but folds back to get out of the way of the binoculars.  Best of all it goes in my pocket.   

This dream hat is a somewhat accidental offering from Lisa Walker, who works in Old Town and who used to crew around the world with a really serious racing team.  It came in a huge green waterproof duffle of gear Lisa gifted us, along with the Eddie Bauer shirt, the foulies that Piers will wear, and stuff we’re saving for when we need to look nautical and nice.   Lisa has recently taken up bike commuting to work from her home in St John (saying it gives her a permanent smile all day long).  This hat should fit nicely under her helmet and bring as much cozy comfort to her two hours a winter day in the saddle as it has to my weeks on the water.   So it will be returned with heartfelt gratitude.  Thank you, Lisa and all the rest of you, for keeping us warm, dry and thinking of you.

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