Saltwater Anchorage in Switzerland?

 

Khutze InletWhen you sail into Khutze Inlet and are surrounded by alpine meadows crisscrossed with whitewater rivulets, you expect to hear cowbells and yodeling.  As you turn to starboard, snow capped blue peaks part in a broad flat light green plain studded with grey rocks and tall dark firs.  In the distance at the end of the valley is a blazing bright completely white high peak.  When the quiet of low tide exposes the alluvial fan that is continuously thrown out by the river to fill a good part of the cirque, the head of the inlet becomes a Swiss lake. 

We have anchored right in 55-75 feet of water at the foot of the waterfalls.  Hundreds of them cascade from the meadows high above our heads in heavenly white ropes.   Near water’s edge they twine in a fury of foam that rushes between two blocks of ice the size of box cars.  

It’s hot.  I take a work day sitting in the aft cabin, my computer filled to the brim with questions, some answers, and a steady flow of sun-born electricity.

The late afternoon – afternoons are long, ending about 10:30 pm – brings visitors.  Dave rows over from the Melody, a sail boat out of Victoria.  His crab trap is full.  Would we like a couple?   He even offers to clean them.  We put aside our beans and get out the hammer.   When sated, we prepare crab salad for our sandwiches the next day.

waterfallsLater, I answer a knock on the stern and find a pretty young woman with blond pigtails  with two blond toddlers standing in an inflatable dinghy.   “Do you have any superglue?” she asks.  Her husband has cut his finger badly and she has heard that superglue is a substitute for stitches.  They are from Bella Bella, naturalists studying brown bear.   He was rigging his tripod and camera with a trip line to catch the bears in action, when he injured himself.  A friend back in their trimaran is helping the victim get bleeding under control.  So while the kids romp around the cockpit, we break out the Outward Bound Wilderness First Aid guide and the information packaged with our fine new kit from the Oregon Trail Chapter of the American Red Cross. She’s not unprepared: has done the necessary training.  Before settling down with kids and grizzlies, in fact, the very young pair had sailed down the east coast from the Maritimes, crossed Panama and sailed back up the west coast.  Just ordinary Canadians.  

Our research turns up nothing on superglue, but we do have a fresh tube and send it back with some breathable, white European style tape that should do the job. Crisis over: the next morning just after dawn they head out only to drop anchor and continue their investigations at an smaller stream fed clearing near the mouth of Khutze Inlet.

 

 

PHOTO  Khutze Inlet
When you sail into Khutze Inlet and are surrounded by alpine meadows crisscrossed with whitewater rivulets, you expect to hear cowbells and yodeling.  As you turn to starboard, snow capped blue peaks part in a broad flat light green plain studded with grey rocks and tall dark firs.  In the distance at the end of the valley is a blazing bright completely white high peak.  When the quiet of low tide exposes the alluvial fan that is continuously thrown out by the river to fill a good part of the cirque, the head of the inlet becomes a Swiss lake. 
We have anchored right in 55-75 feet of water at the foot of the waterfalls.  Hundreds of them cascade from the meadows high above our heads in heavenly white ropes.   Near water’s edge they twine in a fury of foam that rushes between two blocks of ice the size of box cars.  
It’s hot.  I take a work day sitting in the aft cabin, my computer filled to the brim with questions, some answers, and a steady flow of sun-born electricity.
The late afternoon – afternoons are long, ending about 10:30 pm – brings visitors.  Dave rows over from the Melody, a sail boat out of Victoria.  His crab trap is full.  Would we like a couple?   He even offers to clean them.  We put aside our beans and get out the hammer.   When sated, we prepare crab salad for our sandwiches the next day.
PHOTO  Waterfalls
Later, I answer a knock on the stern and find a pretty young woman with blond pigtails  with two blond toddlers standing in an inflatable dinghy.   “Do you have any superglue?” she asks.  Her husband has cut his finger badly and she has heard that superglue is a substitute for stitches.  They are from Bella Bella, naturalists studying brown bear.   He was rigging his tripod and camera with a trip line to catch the bears in action, when he injured himself.  A friend back in their trimaran is helping the victim get bleeding under control.  So while the kids romp around the cockpit, we break out the Outward Bound Wilderness First Aid guide and the information packaged with our fine new kit from the Oregon Trail Chapter of the American Red Cross. She’s not unprepared: has done the necessary training.  Before settling down with kids and grizzlies, in fact, the very young pair had sailed down the east coast from the Maritimes, crossed Panama and sailed back up the west coast.  Just ordinary Canadians.  
Our research turns up nothing on superglue, but we do have a fresh tube and send it back with some breathable, white European style tape that should do the job. Crisis over: the next morning just after dawn they head out only to drop anchor and continue their investigations at an smaller stream fed clearing near the mouth of Khutze Inlet.
Ha
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1 Response to “Saltwater Anchorage in Switzerland?”


  1. 1 Helene July 17, 2009 at 1:14 am

    Hey, it’s true. Suerpglue is better than stitches in many cases. And, Oh Carol this is so beautiful! the pix AND your descriptions. Just so wonderful to read – especially from here in Lagos where it is, um, NOT so beautiful.


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